Large Scale Regenerative Development to Reverse Climate Change was discussed for the first time at the United Nations Oceans Conference in New York, June 5-9.
A common look at today's beach in Indonesia: Plastic trash everywhere. Picture by Oka Dwi P.
A common look at today’s beach in Indonesia: Plastic trash everywhere. Picture by Oka Dwi P.
The World’s nations recognized the rapidly increasing death of ocean ecosystems, and called for a slowdown of the rate at which they are deteriorating, with a special focus on recycling plastics.
More importantly, they called for the first time for the regeneration of critically endangered coral reefs, mangroves, sea grasses, and salt marshes, and their valuable ecological and economic services.
 
Corals also grew on Sea Grass Ecosystem. Picture by Delphine Robbe ©Biorock Indonesia

Corals also grow at Sea Grass Ecosystem. Picture by Delphine Robbe ©Biorock Indonesia

Tom Goreau spoke on NEW METHODS FOR LARGE SCALE RESTORATION OF MARINE ECOLOGICAL AND ECONOMIC SERVICES IN SMALL ISLAND DEVELOPING STATES at the Side Event on Energy Services from Organic Waste – Integrated Waste Management Solutions for Coastal, Marine and Freshwater Protection in Small Island Developing States (SIDS), organized by the Caribbean Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (CCREEE), SIDS DOCK, United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Energy Programme, Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC), South Pacific Regional Environmental Programme (SPREP), Government of Austria, & Government of Spain.
 
An extended video version of this presentation of 13 innovative marine problem solving solutions for large scale restoration of ecosystem environmental and economic services can be seen at:
Video of Dr. Tom Goreau explaining his speech delivered at UN Ocean Conference ©Global Coral Reef Alliance

The Original Post of this article you can find it here

Mangrove seedling grew and appeared when tide was low. Picture by Oka Dwi P.© Biorock Indonesia

Mangrove seedling grew and appeared when tide was low. Picture by Oka Dwi P.© Biorock Indonesia